*|MC:SUBJECT|*

What do Bundaberg, Warwick Farm, & Happy Valley have in common? 75MW registered in March, rocking out at Bluesfest
Email not displaying properly? View it in your browser.
Australian Electricity Industry Ransomed by Solar
*|FACEBOOK:LIKE|**|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|**|TWITTER:TWEET|**|GOOGLE:PLUSONE|*  

One Million Solars! - Celebration or Wake?

Finally, cause to celebrate. And now that everyone isn't manically installing, there's also some time to celebrate. The magic million certainly provided headlines, the problem is that the PV industry is in a state of noticeable contraction, and that the next million systems will come at a much slower rate. Paradoxically it was the reduction and removal of policy incentives that were the greatest drivers of buying behaviour, and now that there's some policy stability (which is actually a policy vacuum), people aren't rushing to make purchases. When they do, they are buying larger systems because the distorting effect of the solar multiplier has been removed (and because panel prices have fallen so far) - indeed record-high average system sizes occurred in every state in the four months. But customer numbers, overall sales volumes, and total revenue are down for almost all solar companies. There are plenty of applicants for feed-in tariffs in Queensland that are still sitting on their hands. This just means its hard to make a buck in PV at the moment, and plenty of Australian PV retailers are winding up. The celebration of one million solar systems may be followed by a hangover that has all the atmosphere of a funeral wake.

The latest Solar Hot Spots data (graphed above; note that recent month's data is very incomplete) shows the December mini-boom brought more Victorians out of the woodwork, somewhat unexpectedly given incentive reductions had occurred three and six months previously. There was even a small upwards blip in Queensland (where 44c Feed-in Tariff installations now represent less than 25% of new installations). And while the data since December is far from complete, we can clearly see an underlying market that is stable and has volume comparable to previous periods that fell between surges driven by incentive reductions. But while a stable underlying market will support many companies, most industry profits came from the peaks, meaning there will be some pain in the year ahead. 

A minor cause for celebration is that some industry stalwarts have ridden out the wave, outlasted the competition, and are now climbing through the ranks. Congratulations in particular to Springers Solar and the Environment Shop.

Market Synopsis

PV Market

  • March saw 75MW of PV registered across Australia, a similar figure to the previous four months
  • Though Queensland is rapidly shrinking, three quarters of Queensland installations are now post-Solar Bonus Scheme.
  • 3kW systems have made a resurgence, and are the most popular sized systems in WA and NSW.
  • Our Insights Premium service allows interactive identification of companies experiencing growth, and those whose activity is declining. 
Want more information? Subscribe to Insights

STC Market

  • The STC target was higher than the market anticipated, which led to a quick uplift in STC price. 
  • We are mid way through the Q1 surrender period, and only half the required volume has been surrendered.
  • Last week was the biggest week ever for STC trading (when account-shifting trades are excluded). Many Liable Entities are scrambling to source their required volume
  • The weekly and monthly STC creation tally are displayed on our website - check in regularly.
Want more information? Subscribe to ClearView.  

Solar Hot Spots

Now there's no solar multiplier, where should you target your sales? This information could help:
  • The Top 10 Postcodes for installation volume in 2012 were from Queensland. Within the top 30 postcodes for installation volume in 2012, only 5 were outside of Queensland
  • Bundaberg topped the list with at least 9.35MW installed in 2012. Warwick Farm was NSW's top spot (2.1MW), Happy Valley was SA's (2.9MW), Hoppers Crossing topped Victoria (4.3MW), and Mandarah was #1 in WA (4.2MW)
  • Parkes (NSW) has to be one of the most interesting hot spots - unresponsive to the 3->2 multiplier reduction but setting records in Q1 2013.
Want more information?  Subscribe to Solar Hot Spots.

PVsell News 

George Kastner of Infinity Solar said of PVsell "How much do I have to pay you to take it off the market?"

We've made the following additions to PVsell over the last month:
  • Implementation of load profile libraries, providing users with sample residential and commercial load profiles that can easily be adjusted and incorporated.
  • Ability to export graphs information to excel.
  • Added another IT developer to our production team, and continued training PVsell support personnel.
  • Development for many more features is also underway. 
Want to be more strategic? Subscribe to PVsell

SunWiz Activities

In the last month, SunWiz has:
  • Performed financial evaluation for a number of commercial projects on behalf of clients
  • Begun analysis of the National Solar Schools Program
  • Released a PV Forecast for the next five years, together with Solar Business Services.
  • Released RETelligence, an LGC market transparency interactive intelligence subscription service.
  • Travelled to Sydney, Brisbane, and Melbourne to provide demonstration and training for PVsell
  • Met with the chairs/CEOs of the CEFC and ARENA
  • Told the world the news of the One Millionth Solar system being installed in Australia
  • Rocked out at Bluesfest

To learn more about what we can do for your solar business, visit www.sunwiz.com.au


Latest Tweets

*|TWITTER:TWEETS12|*

Latest Posts

*|FACEBOOK:POSTS5:sunwiz|*

 Follow on Twitter | Like on Facebook | forward to a friend 

Great Solar Pictures

Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*

Our mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|**|END:IF|*
*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*

 

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Australia returns to an underlying market of at least 370MW; Exceptional Growth in Some Locations 
Email not displaying properly? View it in your browser.
Australia's Solar Hot Spots Revealed
*|FACEBOOK:LIKE|**|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|**|TWITTER:TWEET|**|GOOGLE:PLUSONE|*  

December's Mini-Boom... What now for Australian PV

The Clean Energy Regulator latest data release on Australia's solar suburbs has begun to reveal the extent of the mini-boom that followed the last-minute multiplier reduction last December, which resulted in a 25% increase in solar installations. However, the distribution was not even, with some states making greater use of the last minute sales incentive. Installation volumes rose by 50% in the space of a month in Victoria, which was impressive off the back of its September surge, in which installations doubled in response to the feed-in tariff closure, before falling by two-thirds overnight. Installation volumes in South Australia also jumped 50% for the December mini-boom, and NSW's steady increase accelerated. Western Australians did not rush to the same extent, and Queensland's slow come-down from its Solar Bonus Scheme frenzy caught a slight second wind. 

The 2013 data provided is too incomplete to draw conclusions from, but is already revealing an underlying market of similar size to previous quiet times. Though data is incomplete for the last 12 months, it is especially incomplete for the last 60-90 days, which means 2013 figures are highly understated and show a greater drop-off than has actually occurred. But from these early figures, we can already see that installation volumes in January 2013 were:
  • At least equivalent to the July 2011-January 2012 period in NSW, which followed the end of its Feed-in Tariff installations
  • At least equivalent to the October 2011-January 2012 period in VIC, which followed the first wind-back of its Feed-in Tariff reductions
  • At least equivalent to the October 2011-January 2012 period in WA, which followed the end of its Feed-in Tariff installations
  • Considerably less than the January 2012-April 2012 period in SA, which followed the first wind-back of its Feed-in Tariff reductions
  • Almost equivalent to the July 2011-January 2012 period in QLD, which followed the multiplier reduction from 5 to 3
What this shows is that there is clearly a stable 'underlying' market in Australian PV. The challenge is that January's figures were 31MW or greater - implying that the underlying market is 370-400 MW. This could be seen a cause for celebration, as this was the size of the 'free solar' market in 2009 that was driven by incentives... but its not a volume that will sustain the number of jobs and solar companies that can presently deliver 172MW in a single month, or 1000 MW in 12 months. The challenge for the industry will be to create a sense of urgency for potential solar customers, a sense of urgency that was previously provided by governments when they were about to slash incentives.


The opportunity exists for solar companies to utilise market intelligence that was previously only wished for. The Clean Energy Regulator's data release allows anyone to perform postcode-level analysis on where the best opportunities lie in any region. Through transforming this data set into an interactive visual explorer, SunWiz provides its Solar Hot Spots subscribers with the ability to quickly identify regional growth opportunities. Interestingly, there were some key locations that saw exceptional growth in Q4 2012, and they weren't in areas you would expect. Record figures occurred in one Northern Queensland Location, but two of the most interesting opportunities were in Tasmania, with Launceston recording a record month of 326kW. You can interactively explore a map of total installations by suburb on our Hot Spots webpage. Meanwhile, those interested in which markets and which states to best target over the coming five year period should read this article and about the Australian PV Forecast 2012-2017.

Pssst ...and by the way, we're agonisingly close to celebrating our 1 Millionth PV system in Australia.


To learn more about what we can do for your solar business, visit www.sunwiz.com.au


Latest Tweets

*|TWITTER:TWEETS12|*

Latest Posts

*|FACEBOOK:POSTS5:sunwiz|*

 Follow on Twitter | Like on Facebook | forward to a friend 
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*

Our mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|**|END:IF|*
*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*

Are you looking for the best STC price from most major providers? Click here

Are you interested in keeping up-to-date on shifts and trends in the STC market? Click here

Or in keeping up-to-date on the latest solar industry news (for free) - subscribe to our newsletter.

 

Is the STC Target too low (again), or too high. How will the market play out in 2013? And the STC Price?
Email not displaying properly? View it in your browser.
STC Goldilocks: Too Hot, Too Cold, or Just Right?
*|FACEBOOK:LIKE|**|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|**|TWITTER:TWEET|**|GOOGLE:PLUSONE|*  

STC Target:
Self-fulfilling prophesy or Clearing House Fallacy?

The Clean Energy Regulator recently announced that the 2013 STC Target would be 35.7m, of which 15M was to soak up 2012's over-creation. The market responded immediately with a $2 increase in the price offered by major aggregators, suggesting it thought this was a higher target than expected. But its not all good news, indeed the target implies a contraction in the solar market by 20-25%, and in the meanwhile there will be new market dynamics to watch out for.

The 2013 STC target implies an expected market contraction for the solar power sector, something foreshadowed when SunWiz & SolarBusinessServices released our Forecast 2012-2017 two weeks ago. Ric Brazzale of Green Energy Markets confirms that the market implication is for 780MW of small-scale PV to be installed in 2013. The reason for the sharp price rise was that October 2012 modelling of the non-binding estimate was for 18.46m, but this prior to the early reduction of the multiplier; hence the 20.7m in the target is substantially higher than the market expected. But the market has over-delivered on the Regulator's expectations for two years in a row, what's to say this won't happen again? So, is the estimate too high, too low, or just right? 

Even if the target is out in 2013, it won't be so far out as in previous years, when it underestimated the market by 50%. In those years, state government policies provided drivers for PV uptake that fuelled early multiplier reductions which only fanned the flames. The price signal provided by a declining STC price was outweighed by the installation incentives provided by pending reduction in feed-in tariffs and solar multiplier. In 2013 there can be no further multiplier reduction, and government policy in states with feed-in tariffs (SA and QLD) is well known, which wasn't the case in previous years.  These have been accounted for in the 2013 STC target, and are remnant parts of a larger market. Thus, the STC price signal should act more effectively to reduce oversupply should it occur; (which could be foreshadowed by unexpected installation volumes in either state).

The feedback loop will compensate for oversupply, but what if there's undersupply. Its worth remembering that just reaching the target implies a significant contraction for the PV market, complete with margin pain and business exits. Should a market conditions turn unfavourable, the $40 price cap limits the additional incentive available to coax customers out of the woodwork. However, its my opinion that the STC value is now a small component of PV system pricing, and shouldn't be the sole solar make-or-break factor. 

The long-awaited Clearing House will introduce new dynamics to the STC market. The STC market is designed that over the long term demand should equal supply, so the Clearing House should come into play at some stage. Preliminary analysis by SunWiz for its ClearView subscribers shows that this could be as early as Q3, depending upon the installation volumes particularly for Queensland's remaining Feed-in Tariff applicants, and the timing of sales for the rest of the market. Presently there are some 4.6M STCs in the Clearing House, a volume that decreases marginally each week.

Once the Clearing House queue finally moves, the dynamics get interesting. This might spark a rush to the Clearing House, as STC holders finally cash in (and avoid fees from middle-men). But before that happens, there'd have to be some people waiting at the end of the Clearing House queue who calculate that they're not going to get to the front this quarter, and who don't want to risk another year waiting, so they take a price in the high thirties. In doing so they will have jumped the queue, providing a set back those waiting. ClearView shows that a bank is one of the biggest holders of STCs in the Clearing House queue, so their behaviour may be most illustrative to watch. There may be bets placed on how many STCs shift in each quarter; that way those at the back of the line may win even if they lose. 

Is the target too low (again)?

Before you get too excited about the prospect of the Clearing House handing out the long-awaited $40, you may want to consult a copy of our recently completed Australian PV Installation Forecast 2012-2017. Firstly, our pessimistic forecast is considerably lower than the target, which would imply an unhappy PV industry (at least in most sectors other than the key areas of opportunity identified in the report). Perhaps more happily, our mid-range scenario exceeds the Regulator's forecast by a noteworthy margin, though this news may not excite those in the Clearing House. Our most optimistic scenario, driven by key areas of opportunity, shows that there is still some room for growth in 2013 - as much as 1.2GW when large-scale PV is included. 

If you want to perform well this year AND get a good price for your STCs, make sure you obtain your copy of Australian PV Installation Forecast 2012-2017 and subscribe to ClearView.

Australia's Most Comprehensive, Trusted PV Market Forecast

SolarBusinessServices and SunWiz Consulting are proud to announce the release of their latest intelligence report, “Australian PV Forecast Report 2013-2017”.
Now in its fourth year of publication, this highly sought after report is arguably the most detailed, accurate and highly respected report on the Australian market available in the world.
Based on the combined knowledge of Australia's leading solar industry analysts, this 90 page report includes 58 different graphs and tables describing the latest market segment statistics combined with insightful commentary.
Providing essential reading for anyone considering the Australian market, PV industry professionals, retailers, wholesalers and marketers will all find enormous value in understanding how markets are segmented, concentrated and structured
The Australian solar market is highly dynamic and will undoubtedly continue its metamorphosis over the coming years in line with changing policies and intense competition. 
Growth is predicted in some market segments, but importantly, declines are forecast in others.
Understanding where to focus is essential for any company operating in Australia.
Grab your Australian PV Installation Forecast 2012-2017 now.
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*

Our mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|**|END:IF|*
*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*

 

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

Is this what SunWiz's solar intelligence officer looks like? Cyborg Lance Armstrong, time machines, and supercoaches' secret weapon
Email not displaying properly? View it in your browser.
A Covert Investigation into Performance Enhancers in Australian PV
*|FACEBOOK:LIKE|**|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|**|TWITTER:TWEET|**|GOOGLE:PLUSONE|*  

SHOCK NEWS:
Solar Industry using Performance Enhancers:
...more rife than drugs in sport

Hot on the heels of doping allegations that have rocked professional sport in Australia, evidence is emerging about the use of performance enhancers in the local solar industry. Benefits have been claimed to be offered akin to those provided by vitamin tablets, blood transfusions, and doping injections.  But these performance enhancers are re-shaping the solar industry, and threaten to delineate the ‘haves’ from the ‘have-nots’. In this exclusive investigation, we take a look at some of the performance enhancers in common use, their claimed benefits and potential side effects.

The highly-competitive Australian solar industry is a fertile breeding ground for performance enhancements. The companies that finish first on the Australian ‘solar coaster’ are those that can achieve targeted growth during times of boom and fall back on strong foundations during times of bust. But our investigation shows that performance enhancers won’t show up in blood or urine tests. Instead high-tech solutions are embraced - think of a cyborg Lance Armstrong, complete with genetic engineering, GPS tracking, surveillance drones and augmented reality.

The latest performance enhancer to hit the street is codenamed ‘forecast’. If this were a surfing competition, ‘forecast’ would enable the surfer to choose the most powerful wave, paddle into the best take-off position, and aggressively ride the fastest sections, before coasting off the end while the competition gets dumped and rag-dolled in the impact zone. It’s possible that a time machine has been used in the latest shipment of ‘forecast’ to arrive on the shores. Shown a confiscated copy of Australian PV Forecast 2012-2017, a race official commented “this type of performance enhancement would put users at a massive advantage”. One of the most valued items on the black market, it fetches $4000. Thankfully it’s only released once a year.

Another performance enhancer boasts it will improve user’s vision. Codenamed ‘Insights’, this product has faster and more accurate espionage than the intelligence agencies themselves. The solar industry’s every movement is monitored as it happens by surveillance squads, GPS tracking, and private eyes. Similar technology helped football coaches manage their team more effectively, ‘Insights’ turns General Managers into a solar supercoach. One PV wholesaler was found to be using ‘Insights’ to identify the best rookies to recruit into its team. Its users are addicted, eagerly awaiting each monthly release with $275 clutched in sweaty palms.

An Artificial Intelligence implant is transforming ordinary people into super salesmen. Clutching their tablets to their chest, they perform thousands of calculations in a second, determining the most profitable option for their customer and delivering compelling results in the field. Complained one out-of-work installer, “this game used to be easy, but I can no longer sell with back-of-envelope calculations”. His competitor Geoff Bragg’d “for me PVSell is now faster than ever before... confirmed a sale of a 90kWp system on a University College this week on the back of PVSell analysis!” Development of new features that instantly profile energy consumption is rumoured for release next month, but its pricing seems to be too good to be true, from $450 per year.

New evidence is emerging that traders of what the underworld calls ‘certificates’ are now using a sophisticated online interactive insider intelligence tool (codenamed ClearView) that allows them to track creation, ownership, and trading or ‘certificates’. It is believed that every week they are using this for competitive advantage when selling these ‘certificates’ to addicted energy companies, and paying as little as $56/week for the weekly update. Though previously a small-scale operation, rumours have it that a service (codenamed RETelligence) is about to get Large.

Finally, a rumour has it that some solar companies are using growth hormones. Copies of a tool that instantly identifies high growth regions have turned up on laptop left inside an abandoned Mercedes. Witnesses said the owner drove off in a Ferrari, excitedly thanking “Solar Hot Spots” for his financial success. The growth hormone is suspected to result in a localised outbreak of solar panels, and its believed this may spread like contagion if a tipping point is reached. Police are tracking a receipt for $825, believed to meet four-quarter’s worth of addiction.

Most users of performance enhancers keep their usage a secret from others, which has kept them operating in the shadows. But pushers of the performance enhancers are brazen in their advocacy of their wares. One of the ringleaders and staunch advocate, Nigel Morris, defends the performance enhancers. “They’re not illegal, and the only side effect is improved wealth. You’d be a fool not use the latest technology to improve performance.”
Says Warwick Johnston of Byron Bay-based SunWiz (believed to be behind the most potent performance enhancers) “these technologies are used secretively because their users know that they’re a secret weapon. My clients simply want to maintain their competitive advantage.” But even as some solar companies are out-maneuvered by those using performance enhancers, Warwick is so bold to claim that his wares benefits the solar industry, “the real competition is not from within but against a dirty old foe. Modern technology is the best way to beat their devious old-world methods of ensuring favourable outcomes."
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*

Our mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|**|END:IF|*
*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*

 

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

76MW registered in January, 90kW PV system sold using PVsell, Top Solar Hot Spots, 70 hours without facebook
Email not displaying properly? View it in your browser.
Where did the sun go?
*|FACEBOOK:LIKE|**|FACEBOOK:COMMENTS|**|TWITTER:TWEET|**|GOOGLE:PLUSONE|*  

70 Hours Without Power

Last month, SunWiz experienced first-hand the crippling impacts of a blackout. Following a massive multi-day rain storm that cut off roads in both directions, the power went out right at the moment we were making preparations for high water. In my neck of the woods (the hinterland of Byron Bay), a blackout isn’t such an uncommon occurrence – we lose power twice or thrice per year. We usually light candles, converse with each other, and retire to bed early – only to be woken in the middle of the night by all the lights and appliances switching on when the power resumes. In this case, after 16 hours of candles, conversation, and sleep, we made a rare visit to our next door neighbour, spending the afternoon connecting over a few bottles of red wine.

What made this different was the severity and duration of the power outages. It’s was 70 hours (3 days) without electricity, though some were without for 5 days. When I called to check on the power status, a recorded message informed me that I was one of 18,000 people from Tweed Heads to Bellingen without power, and there were tens of thousands more in South-East Queensland. Apparently the duration of the blackout meant batteries went flat on mobile phone towers, leaving Energex to install portable generators and then run up and down mountains to refuel them.

Losing power makes you realise how much we rely upon it. My first-world list of complaints includes loss of internet, loss of mobile phone coverage (my rural booster went out), loss of facebook (of greater concern for my neighbour’s teenage children who thought this was the foretold-but-delayed apocalypse). After three days, a refrigerator full of warm food really smells.

But perhaps the greatest impact has been the loss of running water. 9km from the nearest town, we live on rainwater and even though our 37,000L tank is now full (twice over), without electricity to pump the water up to our second storey Queenslander, we were  reduced to collecting buckets of water with which to bathe, wash dishes, and flush toilets.

And call me a solar geek but I was also upset about losing $5/day in feed-in tariff payment from my solar power system  (is Essential Energy liable for lost revenue?). We have a 3kW system, and our low-energy lifestyle and solar hot water systems means we produce twice as much electricity as we consume. The morning after the storm cleared, I first though the storm had damaged my system, for its solar inverter was showing a fault light. It took me a moment to remember that that the fault light on my solar inverter was not because there was something wrong with my system but something wrong with the grid. You see, in order to protect the lives of linesmen working to clear faults on the grid, typical solar power systems shut down during blackouts, even during the day. So, for all of the energy available on site, I wasn’t able to use it… hence no running water (or facebook).

A battery backup system can provide power in such cases. But its quite an investment just to avoid the occasional inconvenience of a blackout, particularly if they only last a few hours. Widespread grid interruption events like this are likely to become more common due to climate change. Having already taken a step towards energy independence, I think its time to step towards grid independence. Fortunately, there’s a new suite of products on the market that do more than just provide power during a backup, they can also power your home entirely at off-peak rates, and ensure your electricity retailer doesn't buy your excess solar power for a pittance and on-sell it to your neighbour at a markup. 

A battery-based low-voltage Grid Feed Inverter typically provides the following functions:
·         Provides continuous power when the grid is down.
·         PV continues to operate during outages
·         Can be used with or without PV,
·         PV can be AC Coupled with a Grid inverter or DC Coupled.
·         Export excess PV after Self Consumption
·         Charge batteries from Grid OFF Peak for use during peak periods.

Some brands are able to be retrofit to existing systems regardless of the inverter, some only work work with the same brand of inverter, and some are all-in-one units that replace your existing inverter. The most common solutions currently available in Australia are:
  • Selectronic SPPro: can be retrofit to an existing system, though combining with a Kaco grid-connect inverter enables additional features including enhanced battery utilisation and greater configuration. Can perform grid demand management and export control. About 7000 units already deployed.
  • SMA Sunny Backup: available in 8kW, 44kW, and 110kW units, compatible with SMA grid-connect inverters. About 3000 units already deployed.
  • Nedap Power Router (distributed by SETEC) - an all-in-one unit (options 3kW, 3.7kW, 5kW) with or without storage that is currently available and looks great.
  • Zen Residential Freedom Powebank - about to go into production, provides 14-20kWh of energy storage, allows grid support (network controlled discharging).
  • Sol-Ace Sun-Sink and Grid Demand - currently being produced and available in 5 & 10 kWh units, with prices starting from $3000.

Market Synopsis

PV Market

  • January saw 76MW of PV registered across Australia, a similar figure to December
  • Though Queensland is rapidly shrinking, half of Queensland installations are now post-Solar Bonus Scheme.
  • The average system size is now 3.5kW, and is again on the rise in NSW and WA. 1.5kW systems are only installed in 10% of cases.
  • In the few months of its operation, Greenough Solar Farm has already generated more solar electricity than all other LRET-creating solar systems combined.
  • Our new interactive service allows PV companies to quickly perform SWOT analysis on any of the top 200 market players.
Want more information? Subscribe to Insights

STC Market

  • 7.4M STCs were surrendered in the Q4 2012 surrender period. This still left over 20M STCs available for Q1 2013 surrender, plus whatever is created in the coming months.
  • The government has still not yet announced the STC target for 2013, though the STC price has risen
  • Our Q4 surrender wrap shows the volume of STCs surrendered by each liable entitiy. .
  • The weekly and monthly STC creation tally are displayed on our website - check in regularly.
Want more information? Subscribe to ClearView.  

Solar Hot Spots

Now there's no solar multiplier, where should you target your sales? This information could help:
  • Four postcodes in NSW had bumper fourth-quarters, with installation rates higher than ever before.
  • The top NSW postcode in Q4 was in the Northern Rivers - but one Tasmanian postcode installed nearly as much.
  • Bundaberg's new solar panels will be clean - over 1.6M installed in the last quarter. 
  • My favourite place in Victoria had cumulative growth of 25% in the last quarter.
Want more information?  Subscribe to Solar Hot Spots.

PVsell News 

Geoff Bragg of New England Solar Power said of PVsell "I don't know what you did, but for me PVsell is now faster than ever before. Confirmed a sale of a 90kWp system on a University College this week on the back of PVsell analysis"

We've made the following additions to PVsell over the last month:
  • Tranferred to a faster, more reliable Australian web server.
  • The addition of a monthly production graph, which meets the CEC design requirements at time of quoting
  • The ability to override our performance calculations
  • The ability to download graphs, and to email results directly to customers
  • Integration of disclaimers on your printouts
  • Finer control over what staff members can and can't change in PVsell.
  • We have helped demonstrate how quickly PVsell can 'vet' potential leads, so you can concentrate on real customers. 
Want to be more strategic? Subscribe to PVsell

SunWiz Activities

In the last month, SunWiz has:
  • Prepared the system design of a 500kW ground-mount solar farm
  • Prepared the system design of 100kW and 50kW systems as part of a tender
  • Assisted the APVA with the development of a great new source of solar information
  • Commenced work on the program review of the National Solar Schools Program
  • Ghost written two articles for publication in the newspaper, and one on a blog
  • Prepared O&M Manuals for seven commercial installations
  • Assisted with the grid connection process of multiple 50kW installations
  • Prepared the forecast of installations over the next five years (with Nigel Morris)
  • Assisted as an expert witness of a legal case
  • Survived three days without power

To learn more about what we can do for your solar business, visit www.sunwiz.com.au


Latest Tweets

*|TWITTER:TWEETS12|*

Latest Posts

*|FACEBOOK:POSTS5:sunwiz|*

 Follow on Twitter | Like on Facebook | forward to a friend 

Great Solar Pictures

How big a solar flare really is, and why we should harness the power of the sun.
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*

Our mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|**|END:IF|*
*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*

Page 8 of 15
Join our newsletter!
Please wait